Applied Agile-isms

Below is a collection of quotes from articles published here.

To be Agile implies that there is flexibility for each unique situation, allowing the practitioners and teams discretion to choose what works. Each project is unique, and by choosing an appropriate implementation of a framework – a methodology – that uniqueness is encouraged. 

From Understanding the Agile Mindset

Agile is not a framework. Instead, you can think of it as a collection of frameworks that meet a mindset, possibly including frameworks that have yet to be envisioned.

From Understanding the Agile Mindset

A Mindset is simply a way of thinking about work.

From Understanding the Agile Mindset

A framework is a set of concepts and ideas that guide teams.

From Understanding the Agile Mindset

A Methodology is a specific application of a Framework.

From Understanding the Agile Mindset

In Agile, there’s an emphasis on respecting all of the team members and their creativity.

From Examples of Agile Frameworks

You can see that feedback and learning is greatly valued, to guide delivery of the highest valued work first.

From Examples of Agile Frameworks

Collaboration and communication is a core priority, not just on the team, but all stakeholders, in order to have a shared understanding.

From Examples of Agile Frameworks

Work is divided into small chunks.  Working, functional outputs are delivered on a regular iterative schedule.

From Examples of Agile Frameworks

An organization could apply any framework, such as Lean, Rational, Six Sigma, and of course Scrum, and would still be Agile.

From Examples of Agile Frameworks

In Agile, you are either Inspecting – gathering information based on data, interviews, research or other sources, or you are adapting – taking the information and determining what to do about it. This simple feedback loop is then applied to all levels of planning in the organization.

From What Is Agile Analysis?

  • Feedback guides the discussion of Value.
  • Feedback guides Prioritization.
  • Feedback informs about Opportunities. 
  • Change is uncovered through feedback.
  • Feedback minimizes Uncertainty and Waste.

From What Is Agile Analysis?

The very word “Agile” implies change or flexibility.  Priorities change.  Needs change.  So we have to Adapt.  Agile will constantly be looking at what is going to deliver the highest value, and striving to work on that next.

From Role of Agile Analysis

Agile puts people ahead of tools.

From Agile, Shmagile – What’s So Great About the Agile Manifesto?

It is better to document what works than what you think will work.

From Agile, Shmagile – What’s So Great About the Agile Manifesto?

Don’t document yourself into a corner.

From Agile, Shmagile – What’s So Great About the Agile Manifesto?

When meeting the need, look at the customer instead of the contract.

From Agile, Shmagile – What’s So Great About the Agile Manifesto?

If the plan is set in stone before the work begins, the product may be inadequate before it is implemented.

From Agile, Shmagile – What’s So Great About the Agile Manifesto?

The goal is to find the best of many ways to solve the problem.

From Agile, Shmagile – What’s So Great About the Agile Manifesto?

A decision is not final until it is.

From Agile, Shmagile – What’s So Great About the Agile Manifesto?

Curiosity might have killed many cats, but it makes for great Business Analysis.

From Agile in Everyday Life

See the Whole boils down to two things – Scope and Completeness

From The Basics of Agile part 3 – The Seven Principles of Agile Business Analysis

Your voice through verbal, models, text or any other communication, having developed that knowledge from the Customer of their needs, becomes the Voice of the Customer.

From The Basics of Agile part 3 – The Seven Principles of Agile Business Analysis

Value can be fleeting. That is why we analyze.

From The Basics of Agile part 3 – The Seven Principles of Agile Business Analysis

Examples are an essential element of a shared understanding.

From The Basics of Agile part 3 – The Seven Principles of Agile Business Analysis

Doable is a relative term. Many factors can determine the feasibility of work.

From The Basics of Agile part 3 – The Seven Principles of Agile Business Analysis

Every interaction with a customer, subject matter expert or development team has the potential to make the end result better. All Collaboration therefore contributes to Continuous Improvement.

From The Basics of Agile part 3 – The Seven Principles of Agile Business Analysis

With Agile, gone are the days when the responsibility for the end-result is completely handed off to design and development. Now, to some extent, everyone is responsible for outcomes.

From The Basics of Agile part 3 – The Seven Principles of Agile Business Analysis

If you use the wrong map, you will not get anywhere.

From The Basics of Agile part 3 – The Seven Principles of Agile Business Analysis

Planning in Agile is more of a fluid process.

From The Basics of Agile part 2 – The Waterfall Watering Pool vs The Agile Aquifer

Basics are profound things. The more elemental, the greater the impact.

From The Basics of Agile part 1 – What is Agile

Feedback is built into any Agile environment

From The Basics of Agile part 1 – What is Agile

Customer satisfaction is not measured by a contract or statement of work.

From The Basics of Agile part 1 – What is Agile

Each iteration is a commitment to produce something that works.

From The Basics of Agile part 1 – What is Agile

Give a team the authority to self-govern and they will figure out what works.

From The Basics of Agile part 1 – What is Agile

Focus on what is more important without neglecting those items that support the goal.

From The Basics of Agile part 1 – What is Agile

Change is built into any Agile environment.

From The Basics of Agile part 1 – What is Agile

The Business Analyst role requires a hunger for multifaceted learning… Saying that another way, Business Analysts are exposed to just about everything.

From How I Became a Business Analyst

The benefit of continuous iterations and adaptive planning is that there is less rework due to changes that occur during the product. The change can be built into the end result.

From How I Became an Agile Business Analyst
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